Tagged with characterization

Direct Characterization


There are many ways to create a character for a reader.  Many writers stumble in and out of indirect characterization, which is where the writer takes on the omniscient narrator voice and “tells” us everything about the character that we should know.  In many respects, “telling” a reader what a character is all about is … Continue reading

Character Development: A Step by Step Method


Some of the best characters have spent much time inside the brain of a writer, incubating, developing, becoming more realistic with each thought.  However, one might wonder what the process of creating great characters might entail.  I decided to record my process for creating characters (at least main characters) to help writers who have trouble … Continue reading

5 Questions Every Novelist Should Answer


Writing consumes me.  It consumes most of my time when I’m not playing with my kids, helping my wife out with all the chores necessary to run a household and working full time.  As a teacher, summers are great.  I get to spend more time writing, working on the novel, and generally futzing about with … Continue reading

Tolkien’s 5 Tips for Creating Complex Heroes


Tolkien’s letters are rich with information about J.R.R. Tolkien’s writing process.  I wrote a post last week about Aragorn being Tolkien’s example of an epic hero, and someone posted: “But Frodo Baggins is the hero of the LOTR trilogy, right?”  I would argue that he is not, but only one of three or four characters who together … Continue reading

Juxtaposition: Creating a Foil for Your Heroes


Juxtaposition is defined as an act or instance of placing close together or side by side, especially for comparison or contrast.  Juxtaposed characters are not seen very much in short fiction, but if you are writing a novel you will want to strategically design characters who are foils for your heroes to shine a light on the traits of those heroes. One of the best examples of the use of this … Continue reading