Tagged with composition

5 Ways To Focus On Writing


  There are so many different things in this digital age to distract us from writing.  The picture to the left is of Ernest Hemingway typing a novel on the beach, but the days when a writer could isolate themselves from their tech may be completely gone. Even though I love writing (the process, the … Continue reading

Samantha Shannon: The Next J.K. Rowling?


I read an article today about Samantha Shannon who will release a novel entitled The Bone Season this year.  She is a literature student at Oxford University and many people say she could be the next billion dollar author, as her book will be one of seven books in a series. She has everything going for … Continue reading

Tolkien’s 10 Tips for Creating Epic Heroes


One of my most popular posts is Tolkien’s 10 Tips for Writers, in which I glean from J.R.R. Tolkien’s letters of his wisdom about writing.  Today I will delve into his letters again, but will focus on the epic character Aragorn and ask Professor Tolkien how he created great characters. 1.  Motivational Mirrors – Tolkien … Continue reading

How to Write Descriptively With Metaphors


Metaphors are one of the most used literary devices in the English language second only to similes. The problem with using similes is that they often cause your writing to become a mine field of quantifiers. (i.e. His breath was like the foul smell of a garbage heap and his face was like a pock … Continue reading

Imagery: Beyond “Show Don’t Tell”


I am sure that if you have attended any creative writing courses at all , you have heard the old addage “Show, don’t tell.”  This is referring to the idea that amateur writers often tell us about the action in their narrative rather than “showing” events through imagery, figurative language and good description.  Over the … Continue reading

Deus Ex Machina: God Is Not A Crutch


Breaking Dawn is one of Stephanie Meyer’s most popular books, but it has within its pages a literary device that is something good writers should learn to use properly: deus ex machina. Deus ex machina is defined by my handy Dictionary of Literary Terms & Theory (Penguin) as: “any unanticipated intervener who resolves a difficult … Continue reading

How To Find a Unique Narrative Style


One of the most difficult tasks of writing a long novel is the ability to create a narrative style that is unique, flows well, and remains consistent throughout the 50,000 words or so required for a novel. It also must be a style that catches a reader’s eye from the first few pages.  I have … Continue reading