Tagged with writing tips

3 Writing Tips Gleaned from Ambrose Bierce

3 Writing Tips Gleaned from Ambrose Bierce

Right now my students are reading Ambrose Bierce’s “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge“.  The short story always brings forth different reactions from my students, mostly that some of them see the ending before it hits them, but this is because Bierce is dropping hints throughout the text that illustrate the fact of the surprise … Continue reading

Learning from Twain

Samuel Clemens. Currently my students are reading The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, a novel fraught with controversy, yet a novel with a message of hope.  My students are slowly getting into it as I allow them to record their favorite phrases from the novel on the board as we go through the novel. We are not … Continue reading

Writing Progress: Providence

Word count so far: 14,153. When I began this series, my intention was to tell a story that was engaging and suspenseful, a story that was written in an epic space opera backdrop, but eventually lead the reader on a journey of faith.  I think I’m getting there. The first novel, The Terminarch Plot, is completely … Continue reading

New Podcast Up: Sensitive Suicide Squad

In this episode we discuss two children’s books: “A Birthday Cake for George Washington” by Ramin Ganeshram and “A Fine Dessert: Four Centuries, For Families, One Delicious Treat” by Emily Jenkins. One of these books was banned recently and pulled from Scholastic’s list of books while the other was hailed as an achievement in children’s … Continue reading

Writing Progress: Even More Peril

Word Count: 7,567 Today was a good writing day indeed.  One thing that I think I’m pretty good at is putting my hero in so much peril it makes the reader sick trying to figure out how the poor guy (or gal) will get out of it. My hero was (at the start of where … Continue reading

Describing Facial Expressions

Describing Facial Expressions

One of the most difficult problems plaguing writers is how to describe facial expressions.  The problem arises if the writer does not describe facial expressions at all or if they provide cliche or overused descriptions when writing a narrative. The solution is easier than you might expect. The solution to this is two-fold: Descriptions must … Continue reading